An American Editor

January 21, 2010

A Modest Proposal III: Dying Days of Giant Publishers (Part 2)

In yesterday’s post, I gave four reasons (five if you want to count returns separately) why the giant publishers are on their funeral march: they are too big to react quickly to market conditions; they haven’t learned the Dell lesson; they let others sit in the catbird’s seat of deciding industry policy; and they haven’t come to grips with who are their future customers. Essentially, the giant publishers are early 20th century behemoths who have yet to adapt to 21st century technology and consumers.

These are interrelated problems, all stemming from the same root, which is the giant publisher having ceded industry leadership to outsiders.

In a way, the Dell lesson — Tell the customer he can have it his way and then limit the options — was tackled in my end-the-paperback proposal. Publishers have to learn to create their markets, not be led by markets imposed on them. This is the difference between Amazon, Apple, Google, and the giant publishers.

Amazon led the market by creating the Kindle and Kindle editions, and Apple and Google are inventing their own book markets. The giant publishers are trying to catch up. But Amazon (soon to be joined by Apple and Google), by leading the market defined it and is setting the terms. Amazon is also applying the Dell lesson: You can have an ebook in any format you want as long as it is a Kindle format. The giant publishers, who should have led, instead fumbled so badly that they are in disarray over how to catch up. More importantly, perhaps, for the publishers is that Amazon is turning them into the bad guys in the public relations war for the consumer soul. It’s the problem of the giant publishers being a sumo wrestler when a ballerina is needed — and not recognizing the problem.

To survive the days ahead, the giant publishers need to lead the marketplace, not follow it. If it is true that ebooks are the wave of the future, then publishers need to grab hold of this market and lead it or prepare their funeral pyres.

Publishers need to gain the upper hand in the pricing, geographical, DRM (digital rights management), and format wars. They have started by slowly adopting ePub as the uniform format, but otherwise are in disarray.

My solution: Create an international book repository owned and operated by a consortium of publishers!

Publishers should unite and create a single international repository for every ebook published by member publishers and by self-publishers. Membership should be open to all ebooks with an ISBN. All books would be kept on the repository’s servers. Consumers would buy a book once from a bookseller such as Smashwords or Barnes & Noble, but then be able to read the book on any device they own, without the need to transfer the book from device to device.

Publishers would create a single software system so that if a buyer started reading a book on his dedicated device at home, he could continue reading from the place he bookmarked on his smartphone while commuting to work, on his computer during lunch, on the smartphone for the commute home, and on his dedicated device at home. The repository would also give consumers the option to download a copy of the purchased book to a single device, just as is done now.

This would benefit both consumers and publishers in multiple ways. Here are a few: Because the books would be held remotely, they would be device agnostic. Publishers could use a single uniform format with a single uniform DRM scheme that every device manufacturer could use royalty free. Publishers could enable consumer sharing on a book-by-book basis by allowing, for example, the book buyer to give some number of named individuals access to the book, giving buyers some reasonable ability to share ebooks; different books could have different sharing limits. Consumers could buy a book and access it anywhere at anytime on any device capable of displaying the text — today, tomorrow, and for 99 years into the future. 

The idea is not to replace booksellers. Rather, the bookselling world could continue as is but when an ebook is bought, access to the book would shift from the bookseller to the repository. It could be done as “smoothly and flawlessly” as done now, even with automatic wireless downloading.  With the repository, publishers will lead the ebook marketplace and enhance their survival prospects.

4 Comments »

  1. Hi,

    Very interesting thoughts! Problem is, this is more and more a technology play and giant publishers will be in totally unknown territory competing there. Amazon has shored up so many technology companies that came up in publishing in last decade. Big publishers have got none. Even today there are many good ones – feedbooks, smashwords, bookoven, booklamp and I doubt if big publishers are even thinking about taking up one of them and pitch them against Amazon, Google or Apple. Most probably the big three will end up either buying few of these or killing off the rest buy eating up their business with the help of guess who? – the giant publishers.

    Every publisher needs to immediately create a technology division or invest in one common one beyond their regular 1 man IT teams.

    Abhaya

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    Comment by Abhaya — January 22, 2010 @ 5:50 am | Reply

  2. […] and production services to publishers and authors. This is reprinted, with permission, from his An American Editor blog. PB Digg us. Slashdot us. Facebook us. Twitter us. Share the […]

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    Pingback by A Modest Proposal III: Dying Days of Giant Publishers (Part 2) | TeleRead: Bring the E-Books Home — January 22, 2010 @ 12:16 pm | Reply

  3. […] reader’s ebook discount program for consumers. Establish a central repository (see A Modest Proposal: Dying Days of Giant Publishers) that is device and bookseller agnostic. Improve book […]

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    Pingback by We’re Running as Scared as We Can « An American Editor — February 1, 2010 @ 3:07 pm | Reply

  4. […] multipublisher reader’s ebook discount program for consumers. Establish a central repository (see A Modest Proposal: Dying Days of Giant Publishers) that is device and bookseller agnostic. Improve book […]

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    Pingback by We’re Running as Scared as We Can | TeleRead: Bring the E-Books Home — February 2, 2010 @ 12:11 pm | Reply


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