An American Editor

May 1, 2016

Mark Your Calendar: June 10, 2016

Filed under: A Video Interlude,Uncategorized,Worth Noting — Rich Adin @ 10:09 am
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Why is June 10, 2016 worth marking on your calendar? Because on that day the movie Genius is released — and every editor, author, and publisher should see it (hopefully, it will be worth seeing :)).

Here is the movie’s description from the Sunday New York Times (June 10, 2016, Arts & Leisure Summer Movies, p. 36):

Yes, New Yorkers, there was a time (the 1920s and ’30s) when a book editor could be a superstar. His name was Maxwell Perkins, and everyone called him Max.…[T]his period drama [stars] Colin Firth as Perkins, Jude Law as Thomas Wolfe, Guy Pearce as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Dominic West as Ernest Hemingway and even a couple of women — Nicole Kidman as Wolfe’s love interest and Laura Linney as Perkins’s wife.

For those unfamiliar with Maxwell Perkins, he is considered to be the greatest modern American editor and is noted for having edited and babysat some of American literature’s greatest 20th century authors. Max Perkins was the role model for hundreds of editors up through the 1970s.

Here is the official trailer for the movie:

I am looking forward to seeing this movie. It stars some of my favorite actors and is certainly a subject I can relate to. Perhaps the editorial profession will gain a tiny bit of stature from this release.

Richard Adin, An American Editor

November 23, 2015

Happy Thanksgiving

It’s that time of year again — time seems to pass very quickly at my age — when the family and neighbors come to our house and celebrate (and be thankful for) all the good things that came to us since our last gathering. Each of us has something for which we are grateful; my list is headed by my granddaughters, my children, and my wife.

To celebrate another wonderful year, and to have time to prepare (cooking the turkey is my job :)), An American Editor is taking a break. We’ll be back on Monday, November 30.

All of us at An American Editor — Ruth Thaler-Carter, Jack Lyon, Louise Harnby, Carolyn Haley, and myself — wish you a happy Thanksgiving. We hope you enjoy the following:

A great Johnny Cash moment:

What is Thanksgiving without Charlie Brown?

For the young children:

Happy Thanksgiving!

Richard Adin, An American Editor

 

September 7, 2015

Today is Labor Day & We’re Celebrating

Filed under: A Musical Interlude,A Video Interlude — Rich Adin @ 4:00 am
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Today is the American (and Canadian) Labor Day Holiday, so An American Editor has the day off.

Want to know about the Labor Day holiday? This TED video gives a history:

Raena White provides a musical perspective:

Labor songs were the “meat” of folksingers like Pete Seeger. Here he sings, “Which Side Are You On?”

and “Union Maid.”

Labor Day is (was) a celebration of the rise of the American and Canadian worker from oppressive, free market working conditions. Alas, it seems that the tides are flowing out again.

Enjoy your Labor Day. An American Editor will be back on Wednesday, September 9.

Richard Adin, An American Editor

 

 

June 7, 2015

Worth Noting: Signing Emails & Politics

I came across two things worth noting. The first is No Way to Say Goodbye: You’re Ending Your E-mails Wrong by Rebecca Greenfield. The Bloomberg BusinessWeek columnist has an interesting take on the matter. Here is the video version:

No Way to Say Goodbye

The second item deals with politics and the relationship between your profession and whether you are likely to be a Democrat (liberal) or Republican (conservative). Scroll down to the bottom to find editors.

The Link Between Political Affiliation and Profession

Richard Adin, An American Editor

May 15, 2015

Video Interlude: Shoelace + Hole

Filed under: A Humor Interlude,A Video Interlude — Rich Adin @ 6:29 am
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The impression a grandparent likes to give grandchildren is that of a Renaissance genius — that grandpa is the Michelangelo of the 21st century. When the grandchildren ask a question (especially when the grandchildren are very young), we want to be their encyclopedia. After all, how difficult is it to explain a light-year to a three-year-old? Haven’t yet tried? Well, are you in for a surprise!

But even explaining what are surely simple things, can turn a grandparent’s world upside-down. For example, what do you say when asked: “Poppy, what are the extra [shoelace] holes for in my sneakers?” Well, that’s a stumper? I have to admit that in all my years, I never once thought about those holes — I just ran my laces through them and walked on. It wasn’t a mystery that consumed hours of my time to solve, but it turns out I should have been more curious.

Here is the answer in case you get asked:

You’ll never be stymied by that question again and have expanded your knowledge base — exactly what a professional editor should do.

We now return to our regular editorial programming…

Richard Adin, An American Editor

March 21, 2015

Something to Think About

As long-time readers of AAE know, I like to draw attention to articles and videos that are worth reading/watching and even provoke thinking. Today’s video is about gun buying and educating the gun buyer. I do not want to get into a Second Amendment right argument; I am providing the link because I think the video is worth watching, especially as it is a different approach to the issue of educating the consumer.

Remember that you do not have to watch the video (or read the article linked to below); clicking the link is purely voluntary. For those interested, here is the video, which has gone viral:

Guns With History

I found the reaction of the New York affiliate of the National Rifle Association (NRA), The New York State Rifle and Pistol Association (NYSRPA), interesting: it demanded a criminal investigation of the video and the gun safety group States United to Prevent Gun Violence. For more information, see the Media Watch article: “NRA Affiliate Is So Scared Of This Gun Safety Video That It Wants A Criminal Investigation.”

Richard Adin, An American Editor

January 7, 2015

A Video Interlude: The Lessons You Didn’t Remember Learning

Filed under: A Video Interlude — Rich Adin @ 3:58 am
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My wife came across the following video and it is a very powerful statement of the wrong lessons we are taught by society. Other than urging you to watch and listen, nothing more needs to be said except kudos to these three teenagers.

Changing the World, One Word at a Time

 

Richard Adin, An American Editor

December 24, 2014

Happy Holidays!

Filed under: A Video Interlude — Rich Adin @ 4:00 am
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At An American Editor, we are taking some time off to celebrate the holidays. We will be back on Monday, December 29.

From Western University (Canada):

From the Minions:

Let us not forget Hanukkah, even though it is soon over:

Let’s end with a “tribute” to modern holiday celebrations. If you watch nothing else, give this one a try:

Best wishes for a happy holiday from all of us
at An American Editor to all of you!

Happy Holidays!

Rich Adin, An American Editor

Louise Harnby

Ruth Thaler-Carter

Erin Brenner

Jack Lyon

Amy Schneider

November 26, 2014

Happy Thanksgiving!

Filed under: A Humor Interlude,A Video Interlude — Rich Adin @ 4:00 am
Tags:

At An American Editor, we are taking a holiday break to enjoy Thanksgiving with friends and family. We’ll be back on Monday, December 1, with our usual informative articles.

To tide you over until then, sit back, relax, and enjoy —

A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving

and for those needing to review their history, a crash course:

When is Thanksgiving? Colonizing America: Crash Course US History #2

Happy Thanksgiving!

Richard Adin, An American Editor

July 2, 2014

A Brief Respite

Filed under: A Video Interlude — Rich Adin @ 4:00 am
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An American Editor usually publishes on Monday and Wednesday but July 2 thru July 8 AAE will be taking a break. We’ll be back on July 9.

Enjoy your week and for those of us who celebrate July 4 as Independence Day,

Happy Birthday, America!

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