An American Editor

June 10, 2013

On Today’s Bookshelf (XIII)

It has been months since I last shared what I am reading with you. (If you are interested in reading prior On Today’s Bookshelf articles, please click the link “On Today’s Bookshelf” above.) Alas, I wish I could say that my to-be-read pile is getting smaller, but it isn’t. It seems as if not a day passes when I am not adding yet another book or two or three to the TBR pile; although I am managing to make my way through the books, I am adding new books faster than I can read what books I already have in the TBR pile.

In a way, my situation has become more complicated. Recently, Barnes & Noble sent me a coupon for a great deal on the Nook HD or HD+. The HD is a 7-inch tablet with a 720p screen; the HD+ is a 9-inch tablet with a 1080p screen. I already own — and am very happy with — a 7-inch Nook Tablet (it’s just not high definition) but after looking at the device in my local B&N, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to buy the HD+ for slightly more than half price. So now I have a Sony 7-inch eInk reader that my wife uses, a 7-inch Nook Tablet, and a 9-inch Nook HD+ Tablet.

What I have done is divide my books. On the Nook Tablet, I read fiction; on the Nook HD+ I am reading nonfiction and occasionally watching a video. The Nook HD+ is perfect for nonfiction and for PDF documents. However, the more I use the HD+ tablet, the more I like it, so I expect it won’t be long before all my books are on the HD+.

Here is a list of some of the books that I am reading (or acquired since the last On Today’s Bookshelf post) either in hardcover or in ebook form:

Nonfiction —

  • If Rome Hadn’t Fallen by Timothy Venning
  • The March of Folly: From Troy to Vietnam by Barbara Tuchman
  • Cleopatra: A Life by Stacy Schiff
  • The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss
  • Empire: What Ruling the World Did to the British by Jeremy Paxman
  • Beyond Belief: The Secret Lives of Women in Extreme Religions by Susan Tice & Cami Ostman
  • Inside the Centre: The Life of J. Robert Oppenheimer by Ray Monk
  • Hitler’s Commanders by Samuel W. Mitchum, Jr.
  • Carthage Must be Destroyed by Richard Miles
  • Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham
  • Perfect Victim by Christine McGuire & Carla Norton
  • A World Lit Only by Fire: The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance by William Manchester
  • Scandalous Women: The Lives and Loves of History’s Most Notorious Women by Elizabeth Mahon
  • The End: The Defiance and Destruction of Hitler’s Germany 1944-1945 by Ian Kershaw
  • Belisarius: The Last Roman General by Ian Hughes
  • The Forge of Christendom: The End of Days and the Epic Rise of the West by Tom Holland
  • All Hell Let Loose: The World at War 1939-1945 by Max Hastings
  • The First Four Notes: Beethoven’s Fifth and the Human Imagination by Matthew Guerrieri
  • The Sun and the Moon: The Remarkable True Account of Hoaxers, Showmen, Dueling Journalists, and Lunar Man-Bats in Nineteenth-Century New York by Matthew Goodman
  • Caesar: Life of a Colossus by Adrian Goldsworthy
  • The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language by Mark Forsyth
  • A World on Fire: Britain’s Crucial Role in the American Civil War by Amanda Foreman
  • Cicero by Anthony Everitt
  • Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan 1839-1842 by William Dalrymple
  • The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City & Sparked the Tabloid Wars by Paul Collins
  • The Rape of Nanking by Iris Chang
  • The Publisher: Henry Luce and His American Century by Alan Brinkley
  • The Second World War by Antony Beevor
  • The Watchers: A Secret History of the Reign of Elizabeth I by Stephen Alford

Fiction —

  • House of Steel: The Honorverse Companion, Vol. 1 and In Fury Born (2 books) by David Weber
  • Antiagon Fire by L.E. Modesitt, Jr.
  • Inda; The Fox; Treason’s Shore; and King’s Shield (4 books) by Sherwood Smith
  • The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch
  • The Purples by W.K. Berger
  • City of Dragons and Blood of Dragons (2 books) by Robin Hobb
  • The Serpent’s Tale; A Murderous Procession; Mistress of the Art of Death; and Grave Goods (4 books) by Ariana Franklin
  • I am Forbidden by Anouk Markovits
  • The Cadet of Tildor by Alex Lidell
  • Season of the Harvest and Forged in Flame (2 books) by Michael R. Hicks
  • The Daylight War by Peter V. Brett
  • A Walk Across the Sun by Corban Addison
  • The Blade Itself; Last Argument of Kings; and Before They are Hanged (3 books) by Joe Abercrombie
  • Immortals of Meluha and The Secret of the Nagas (2 books) by Amish Tripathi
  • Game of Souls by Terry C. Simpson
  • Ruins of Legend; Nature Abhors a Vacuum; and In Defence of the Crown (3 books) by Stephen L. Nowland
  • The Traitor Queen by Judi Canavan
  • The Concubine’s Daughter by Pai Kit Fai
  • The Pledge by Kimberly Derting
  • Little, Big by John Crowley

That’s some of what I am currently reading. I’ve got about a dozen hardcovers on preorder and a growing list of hardcovers I want to purchase.

Please feel free to share your reading list with us. Doing so may well bring your favorite authors some new readers.

January 16, 2013

On Today’s Bookshelf (XII)

I can’t keep away from books, which is probably why I retired from my life as a lawyer and became an editor. Once books and reading get hold of you, they never let go — somewhat like that alien being in the latest science fiction thriller. It has been quite a while since the last On Today’s Bookshelf (March 2012), so here are a few of the hundreds of books and ebooks I have acquired since then —

Hardcovers —

  • Fairness and Freedom: A History of Two Open Societies: New Zealand and the United States by David Hackett Fischer
  • Princeps by L.E. Modesitt, Jr.
  • The Story of Ain’t by David Skinner
  • Heaven on Earth by Sadakat Kadri
  • Henry Ford’s War on Jews by Victoria Saker Woeste
  • On Politics: A History of Political Thought by Alan Ryan (2 vols)
  • When General Grant Expelled the Jews by Jonathan Sarna
  • The Atheist’s Bible by Georges Minois
  • Comprehensive History of the Jews of Iran by Habib Levi
  • The Story of English in 100 Words by David Crystal
eBooks
  • The Witness Quartet: Silent Witness, Privileged Witness, Expert Witness, Hostile Witness by Rebecca Forster
  • Voices of the Dead by Peter Leonard
  • The Stolen Crown by Susan Higginbotham
  • The Devil’s Cradle by Sylvia Nobel
  • Night Swim by Jessica Keener
  • Leaving Before It’s Over by Jean Reynolds Page
  • El Gavilon by Craig McDonald
  • Cooking the Books by Bonnie S. Calhoun
  • The Savior of Turk by Ron D. Smith
  • To Serve the High King by Fran LaPlaca
  • The Death of Kings by Marcus Pailing
  • Paradise Burning by Blair Bancroft
  • Daisy’s War by Shayne Parkinson
  • Cephrael’s Hand by Melissa McPhail
  • Song of Dragons: The Complete Trilogy by Daniel Arenson
  • The Phoenix Conspiracy by Richard Sanders
  • Circles of Light (6 vols) by E.M. Sinclair
  • Whispers of a Legend by Carrie James Haynes
  • The Other Worlds by M.L. Greye
  • Anca’s Story by Saffina Desforges
  • Blaze of Glory by Sheryl Nantus
  • Blue Murder by Emma Jameson

Many of the books and ebooks in the above lists I have yet to read. The lists are not recommendations, just a compilation of books and ebooks I have bought (or received as gifts) in the past few months. It is not a complete list. I’m sorry to write that my appetite for books grows much faster than my ability to read the books.

I looked at my to-be-read pile of books and discovered that I have more than 2,500 books waiting for my attention. (At the time of On Today’s Bookshelf (XI), my TBR was approaching 500 books, of which about 70 were hardcovers. I wish I could say I made a serious dent in that TBR pile before going on a shopping spree, but I didn’t.) Fortunately, most of the books are ebooks, so they take up little physical space.

One part of my problem as regards hardcover books is that most of the hardcover books in my TBR pile (and in the list above) lead me to buy other books. I will read an interesting point in a book, look at the note to the point, and decide I need to buy a copy of the book cited by the author in support of the interesting point.

A second part of my hardcover problem is that I have a long-term subscription to The New York Review of Books, each issue of which I faithfully read — both articles/reviews and the advertisements — which leads me to buy even more hardcover books.

Then I run into the problem of favorite authors coming out with new books, some of whom are very prolific, publishing a couple of new hardcovers every year.

At least when I retire, which is likely to be years from now, I won’t wonder what I’ll be doing. I’ll be attacking my ever-increasing TBR.

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: