An American Editor

November 28, 2012

The Holiday Gift: To eBook or to Hardcover?

Filed under: Books & eBooks,Miscellaneous Opinion — americaneditor @ 4:00 am
Tags: , , , ,

Increasingly, the reader in the family is reading ebooks and many of us are thinking that an ideal gift for the ebook reader is either an ebook gift certificate or some desired ebooks themselves. In my case, I was thinking about asking for ebooks (as opposed to asking for hardcover books), but then I got to wondering: If I give an ebook as a holiday gift, what message am I sending to the gift recipient?

My off-the-cuff answer is “I love you” or “It’s great that you are my friend” or some similar positive message. But after mulling the matter over for a while, I wonder how positive the message really is. Yes, I know that many readers prefer to read ebooks and that increasingly readers only want to read ebooks. Yet the question arises because this is a message-bearing gift, even if the message is left unsaid.

When I give a reader a hardcover book, I give the reader something they can see constantly. As it sits on the bookshelf, it acts as a reminder that I cared enough to give them a gift. Depending on the book, it may also have a visual presence that is much more than a reminder that the book was a gift (think of a book about paintings, for example). Plus, if given to, for example, a grandchild, I can inscribe the hardcover with something pithy, like “Happy 9th birthday. Love, Grandpa.” The hardcover is a constant reminder that I care. A few years from now, when the grandchild loses all sentimentality and wants to raise some cash to buy the latest video game, the grandchild can sell the hardcover on the used book market and get a few more dollars toward the purchase price — the hardcover gives again.

The hardcover also is returnable and exchangeable. I bought the book that promotes being a carpenter but mommy and daddy want the child to have a book that encourages a career in quantum physics. I think dragons and fairies are great for 8-year-olds; mommy and daddy think a grounding in reality is better.

The ebook, on the other hand, doesn’t really have a presence. It becomes one of hundreds on the reading device; it doesn’t stand out and remind anyone that this was a gift given with love. And let’s face it, the ability to inscribe something pithy in an ebook just doesn’t have that “magic” ring to it. Of course, since I am buying the ebook for someone else, I also have to hope — with all fingers crossed — that the ebook is properly formatted and isn’t riddled with errors. Giving a poorly formatted, error-riddled ebook as a gift is like giving a TV without a remote control — it will work but the recipient will be a bit grumpy about how well it works.

Plus when I give an ebook, what am I really giving? A license that can be revoked on a capricious whim by the seller (consider the recent Fictionwise debacle); a book that can be here today and gone tomorrow because a cloud failed; a book that cannot be exchanged or returned should it turn out to be the wrong book or inappropriate because about midway through it has a steamy erotic scene even though the book has been rated great for 8-year-olds (or, in today’s vitriolic political environment, the book discusses evolution and the parents are creationists).

I suppose the answer is to give an ebook gift card but how impersonal can one get? That is OK for a business associate, but is that what I really want to give my child or grandchild? What thought (and effort) goes into giving a gift card? I think of gift cards as the gifts of last — last resort and last minute — the gift that says I ran out of ideas; I can’t think of anything for you (what message does that send!); I ran out of time to do shopping; I got lazy; and so on. Besides, how memorable (or exciting) is it to receive a gift card? I can’t ever remember dragging a friend to my bedroom to show him the gift I got from Granny when it was a gift card.

I guess I could avoid my dilemma by simply not considering buying books at all as holiday gifts, but as an editor, I’d like to support my industry in hopes that it will continue to provide me a livelihood for years to come, and, more importantly, books are the gateway to knowledge and there is nothing better than spreading knowledge. Additionally, when that remote control race car finally has seen its last days and joins the scrap heap of once-loved toys, the book I give should still be available.

If my child or grandchild is like me, he or she will treasure books they receive and think of holding them for future generations. Few of us do that with the busted light saber we received for last year’s holiday. That’s another positive to hardcover books — they can be passed on to subsequent generations and evoke the same positive emotion in that generation as was evoked when the gift was originally given. They are the gift that can keep on giving.

Yes, the same is true of ebooks. The text file can be given again and again, perhaps for hundreds or thousands of generations to come and each giving will be in pristine form — assuming that 100 years from now there will be devices available that are capable of reading the file. We assume that today’s text file will be forever readable, but that may not be so. Today’s popular or dominant formats may simply be echoes of the past in the future. A hardcover book, however, we know is likely to be readable 500 years from now because we are reading books from 500 years ago.

(Remember this video of a monk being introduced to the wonders of the new-fangled gizmo called the book?

Even if this is how it has to be done 500 years from now, it at least can be done, which is something that cannot be said with certainty about an ebook file.)

In balancing the pluses and minuses of to ebook or to hardcover, I come to the conclusion that for gifts I will give, I will give hardcover books, not ebooks. eBooks send the wrong message and not enough of the message I want to send. Even for gifts to me, I will designate hardcover desired. I want to be reminded regularly from whom I received “this” book and for what occasion. I do not want the gifted book to simply become another file among my many thousands of already-owned ebook files — a file that once read will most likely never be seen again. I want to know that someone cares and be reminded that they care.

What are your gifting plans?

8 Comments »

  1. You make a great point! I love to give books for exactly the same reasons. But I don’t think our books today would last 500 years… The paper was different 500 years ago and the way the books were kept was different too. But they might survive a bit more than 100 years from now, anyway, I hope longer that some textfiles for ebooks?

    Comment by expatsincebirth — November 28, 2012 @ 5:45 am | Reply

  2. Reblogged this on expatsincebirth and commented:
    If you’re wonder whether to give an ebook or a hardcover book as a gift, read this brilliant post!

    Comment by expatsincebirth — November 28, 2012 @ 5:51 am | Reply

  3. I already bought books for my grandchildren. Amazon says they will arrive today by 2-day shipping. Long live pbooks.

    Comment by theoriginalbookdoctor — November 28, 2012 @ 1:39 pm | Reply

  4. It depends on the reading preferences of the person I am giving the book to. Do they want an ebook or a print book? The best gift is one that suits the recipient.

    Comment by carmen webster buxton — November 28, 2012 @ 2:40 pm | Reply

  5. I enjoy Kindle immensely but if the book is special, for whatever reason, then I buy the hardcopy for my library. For one thing it’s easier to find notes and highlights in a hard copy and there is just something wonderful about a book you can hold. On the other hand, I can see how some people might not want another book cluttering up their space yet they love to read. So if I want to give something to such a person that is more in the nature of a keepsake then I would choose something else other than a book. It’s a tough call and a very thoughtful post.
    Warmth and Peace

    Comment by Robert-preneur — November 28, 2012 @ 4:28 pm | Reply

  6. As someone who much prefers substance to style and despises clutter and waste, I’ve already requested Kindle books for Christmas.

    Comment by Karin — November 28, 2012 @ 10:44 pm | Reply

  7. Reblogged this on ebooktechnologies.

    Comment by ebooktechnologies — December 3, 2012 @ 12:35 am | Reply

  8. […] and books make great gifts. Before you go online or to the bookstore, you may like to read one editor’s opinion about whether to buy paper books (pbooks) or ebooks. If you’ve already made up your […]

    Pingback by Reading for Work or Pleasure | Beyond Paper Editing — October 2, 2014 @ 10:30 am | Reply


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