An American Editor

September 14, 2016

The Business of Editing: The Kneecapped Editor

We all have goals, whether adding new clients, making more money, or having more time to spend with the grandchildren. Yet you’ll notice two distinguishing features: first, our goals are often not challenging; second, if they are challenging, they are often not met or accomplished.

If we look around, we see goal-attainers like Elon Musk (PayPal, Tesla Motors, Solar City, SpaceX) and Jeff Bezos (Amazon, Washington Post, Blue Origin) and think “There but for the lack of luck go I!” Such thinking really amounts to self-deception. We deceive ourselves into thinking that the difference between being a Musk or Bezos and being ourselves is something other than vision and self-esteem.

Think about how you tackle your editing work. It isn’t with imagination or vision. You tackle it today just as you did yesterday, last week, last month, last year. After all, how “visionary” or “imaginative” can one be when dealing with spelling and grammar? More importantly, think about how you go about finding new business and increasing your rates and doing myriad other business-focused tasks. All of us are constrained by how we view ourselves — some more than others — but our sense of self-esteem figures prominently in the outcome.

Colleagues who are excellent editors think of themselves as just average — not outstanding and certainly not as “the best.” As a consequence, they struggle to raise prices, to say no, to find new clients, to move outside their lifelong comfort zone. Be assured that this problem of low self-esteem is not unique to editors; we have been taught it since our babyhood, usually framed in the message of how important it is to follow rules and not rebel.

Yes, we all need to follow rules for society to function well, but there are levels and degrees of rebelliousness, ranging from meek acquiescence to outright defiance. The key is to find the proper levels and degrees — the ones that paint a positive portrait of your skills and make you so desirable that clients are willing to at least negotiate with you.

The editor–client relationship is like a mating ritual. We need to be the colorfully feathered peacock who makes clients want to dance with us and not some other editor. As in other aspects of life, the first step is belief in yourself.

When I give presentations, I often introduce myself by saying something like “I am the greatest of all editors.” I am always amused at the reaction, especially as I tend to repeat that several times during the course of the presentation. Some editors take umbrage, some just shake their head, and some get the message, which is that I have confidence and that I believe in myself, which is the foundation to success.

It is important, not because I say directly to clients, “You need to hire me and pay whatever I demand because I am the greatest of all editors,” but because my belief in myself and my abilities gives me the confidence to say to a client, “No, I cannot accept this project at the proposed fee and schedule. If you want me, you must agree to my terms.” And, even more importantly, it gives me the confidence to decline a project because I know — with confidence and certainty — that another project will be coming my way.

How do I know this? Because I message the confidence that I have built in myself when I discuss whether or not I will accept a project. Because I have convinced myself that I am an editor any author would be thankful for; because I have convinced myself and conveyed to clients that I am the superstar of the editing world.

Okay, I can hear your derision even over the internet. But think about it. Do you approach business meekly or like a lion?

Most of us approach life meekly; we want to avoid conflict. And in many cases that approach works fine. But it doesn’t work when you are self-employed, reliant on what you earn, and in competition with thousands of others for the same jobs. It is not that you need to be aggressive; it is that you need to stand tall, even to yourself, and not be led by others.

You also need the confidence to take advantage of opportunities that present themselves. For example, famous author Richard Adin (who, after all, is more famous than the author of the chart-topping book The Business of Editing?) asked you to read and critique his book. It doesn’t matter whether this is paid or volunteer work; what matters is that you were asked. If it were me, I would be adding to my spiel to clients that I helped Richard Adin perfect his book — I do not need to say that I just critiqued Chapter 3. But few editors do that. They think their contribution was too minor or insignificant or that clients wouldn’t consider it important. Or they do not want to sound boastful. Or they offer up myriad other excuses. Yet if you are the world’s greatest editor, it is only right that a great author has asked your opinion or had you edit their book or proofread it or whatever. You worked on it; so boast about it.

Understand the way business operates: money is attracted to money, and greatness is attracted to greatness. Setting aside Donald Trump’s sad campaign for president, he is a perfect example of the concept — not the execution — of the importance of outward self-esteem. What does Trump sell? He sells the image of prestige and luxury. How does he do it? By believing that properties that bear his imprint are the world’s finest examples of prestige and luxury, and by convincing others of the same. Of course, the properties that bear his name need to also meet that standard, but when he started, there was just his self-belief.

And that is what the most successful editors do — they project an image, which they back up with skilled editing. But the purpose of having self-esteem and confidence is to obtain the opportunities to demonstrate that you have the skills. It does little good to be highly skilled but have little work.

Remember that your editorial business is about you and how you, because of your great skill, can and will help clients achieve their goals. Be confident in yourself and your clients will be confident in you. Never forget that low self-esteem can kneecap the best of us. Believing in yourself is the difference between being one of the crowd and one of the few.

And if you do nothing else, watch the following video to its end, and especially note the final words.

Richard Adin, An American Editor

5 Comments »

  1. “The editor-client relationship is like a mating ritual. We need to be the colorfully feathered peacock who makes clients want to dance with us and not some other editor. As in other aspects of life, the first step is belief in yourself.”

    What a wonderful way of putting it!

    I respond more positively to that motivator than the “I am the greatest editor” one, in terms of understanding the point that self-confidence and assertiveness are crucial components of success. I just keep tripping on that superlative word, “greatest.” Making such a claim to myself burdens me with the expectation of being perfect, which I know that neither I nor anyone else is. That’s why I shoot consistently (and attain) a 9 out of 10 level of performance, overshooting as much as possible to a 9.5, 9.7, 9.9…

    “The key is to find the proper levels and degrees — the ones that paint a positive portrait of your skills and make you so desirable that clients are willing to at least negotiate with you.” And: “[Meekness] doesn’t work when you are self-employed, reliant on what you earn, and in competition with thousands of others for the same jobs. It is not that you need to be aggressive; it is that you need to stand tall, even to yourself, and not be led by others.”

    Yes.

    “Remember that your editorial business is about you and how you, because of your great skill, can and will help clients achieve their goals.”

    I’ve put my business emphasis on that last part — helping clients achieve their goals — and it became the turnaround point in my personal and business growth. Selling is about the customer; how whatever thingamajig or service will help *them*. That’s what people want to pay for, so if they believe you can and want to and are happy to help them, they will be much more inclined to work with you.

    Like

    Comment by Carolyn — September 14, 2016 @ 7:44 am | Reply

  2. I love “We need to be the colorfully feathered peacock who makes clients want to dance with us and not some other editor” !

    I was chosen to be featured as one of the “Women of Brighton” (the suburb of Rochester, NY, where I went to junior and high school, and now live again) for a local magazine (I’m very excited!). That includes being in a cover photo with 10 other women. When I showed up for the photo shoot, I was amused to see that all the others were wearing solid colors in black, blue, green and beige. One did have on a purple jacket, but it was a dark shade that looks almost black. Another wore a purple dress, but a solid version. I was wearing … a bright-print dress in shades of purple (of course!), pink and maroon.

    Serendipitously, I just now received a proof of the group photo as I was reading Rich’s column. Guess who stands out? Now I’m going to call this my peacock moment and remember that part of self-esteem and standing up for yourself in business with confidence has something to do with that kind of moment.

    Like

    Comment by Ruth E. Thaler-Carter — September 14, 2016 @ 11:23 am | Reply

    • In modern parlance, Ruth, methinks you’ve created a “brand” for yourself!

      Like

      Comment by Carolyn — September 15, 2016 @ 5:27 am | Reply

  3. A truly excellent post, Rich. Thanks for writing it.

    Like

    Comment by Jack Lyon — September 14, 2016 @ 1:01 pm | Reply

  4. Love this post!

    Like

    Comment by Cynthia — September 20, 2016 @ 5:00 pm | Reply


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